How mad do you need get to destroy your car? What if it was a Gallardo?

Well this Chinese owner would destroyed his Gallardo over a dispute with the dealership.

The millionaire reportedly bought a Gallardo (price up to $700,000 in China) last November. Six months later, the engine wouldn’t start. The car was transported to the dealer, in Qingdao, who allegedly didn’t fix the problem but dinged the bumper and chassis during the trip. The irate owner tried unsuccessfully to get the problem fixed, to no avail. He escalated his case all the way up to Lamborghini CEO Stephen Winkelmann, but apparently the dispute wasn’t resolved.

So on March 15, World Consumer Rights Day, the Lambo owner hired a team with sledgehammers to destroy the car in public.

You can see the destruction here:

Lamborghini later issued a statement saying: “We put customer satisfaction first at Lamborghini and think that in this case we did everything to solve the problem. We solved the problem to the satisfaction of the customer.” The statement added that for reasons that are “independent from the relationship with Lamborghini, the owner decided to take this action and smash the car.”

The media later reported that the owner was a Japanese-Chinese businessman who imported the car from Japan. The Gallardo wasn’t even new, but was eight years old and probably was valued at about $80,000.

Apparently, the Lambo owner had a problem with the car, which was promptly fixed. But the owner had a larger business dispute with the businessman who owned the Lamborghini dealership in Qingdao. The event was used for the owner to gain publicity for his own business and to discredit the owner of the Lambo dealer owner.

This explanation is more compelling given the fact the owner placed stickers on the car bearing his own company’s logo (As you can see in the photo above). He also smashed the car in front of his company’s office building, to direct more attention to his business.

I guess the answer to the opening question would be: no one. At least no one is mad enough to calmly hire a group of workers, put banners on the car, drag the car to office and wait until World Consumer Rights Day before smashing the car.

via WSJ 1 and 2

China’s been breaking all sorts of records these past few years. From the “World’s Longest Bridge” to the “World’s Largest LED Screen”, China holds quite an impressive list of World records.

Recently, the title for the “World’s Most Expensive Dog” was snatched by China – again. A red Tibetan Mastiff, named “Hong Dong”, was sold for 10 million yuan (around $1.5 million) to a coal baron from North of China. Before the sale, the World’s most expensive dog was another Tibetan Mastiff who was sold in 2009 for 4 million yuan ($608,680).

“Hong Dong”, is 11-months-old but already stands nearly three-feet-high at the shoulder and weighs more than 180lbs, according to his breeder, Lu Liang. “He is a perfect specimen,” said Mr Lu, who runs the Tibetan Mastiff Garden in Laoshan, near the eastern Chinese city of Qingdao. “He has excellent genes and will be a good breeding dog.” “The price is justified,” he said. “We have spent a lot of money raising this dog, and we have the salaries of plenty of staff to pay.”

According to Mr Lu, the Tibetan Mastiff was fed a diet of chicken and beef, spiced up with exotic Chinese delicacies such as sea cucumber and abalone. That sounds like a luxurious life even for a human. Considering that abalone is something most living in China will never taste in their entire life, I would say that most would wish to rather be reincarnated as this dog.

But is a rare breed and an opulent style of nurturing worth such a high price? The new owner definitely thinks so. The male dog can be hired out to other breeders for as much as 100,000 yuan a shot, so it can be considered more as an investment than pet.

Tibetan Mastiffs are huge and fierce guard dogs that have stood watch over nomad camps and monasteries on the Tibetan plateau for centuries. They are thought to be one of the world’s oldest breeds, and legend has it that both Genghis Khan and Lord Buddha kept them.

More recently, however, they have become highly-prized status symbols for China’s new rich. The dogs are thought to be a pure “Chinese” breed and they are rarely found outside Tibet, giving them an exclusivity that other breeds cannot match.

via Telegraph.

qingdao-haiwan-bridge-1

At 26.4 miles long, the Qingdao Haiwan Bridge would easily cross the English Channel and is almost three miles longer than the previous record-holder, the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway in the American state of Louisiana.
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