Tids

I probably would have thought that this was the real thing if it was on the supermarket shelf. It’s not like I really care that much about washing powder…

This past Sunday has been labeled “Black Sunday” by Chinese netizens after China’s major file sharing site VeryCD disabled all its downloads.

Being one of the leading file-sharing sites in China, VeryCD was the major source of eMule downloads for music and videos. It had virtually everything – from Hollywood blockbusters to Korean pop songs to Japanese TV shows. Although the site is still accessible, all download links have been removed, in its place are links to licensed contents. VeryCD is now moving towards legitimacy by obtaining an official license to operate and moving towards authorized content.

After 7 years of good times, a lot of users will definitely be deeply saddened. After avoiding a crackdown against many similar sites in 2008, the pressure on VeryCD in 2011 was clearly too much. Earlier this month, China’s attempts at reducing copyright infringement have increasingly targeted the digital domain and while Youtube-like sites have taken up much of the spotlight, it was only a matter of time before linking sites like VeryCD felt similar heat.

It seems the crackdown on online piracy is now in full force and a lot earlier than most anticipated. Earlier this month, the Supreme People’s Court, the Supreme People’s Procuratorate and the Ministry of Public Security released a document which detailed penalties for online copyright infringement.

If someone uploads a movie, TV show, music, software or even image to the Internet without the consent of the copyright holder, penalties apply if certain conditions are met. These include if more than 500 pieces of the work are spread to others, if total online downloads hit 50,000 or if a site where the material is located has a sign-up membership of more than 1,000. Penalties are harsh – between 3 and 7 years in jail.

via TorrentFreak.

sdidsa

At first, I was asking myself wtf is with the name. Then, I realized they just replaced all the letters “a” with “s” and vice versa.

McBurgers

I presume the stuff under the M must represent a stack of burgers?

Here’s a quick lesson in the art of fake-ness. Sometimes you don’t have to change the letters at all. All you have to do is rearrange the order of the letters.

A clever switch and you might even end up with something more meaningful than the original.

Spoony

The copycats in China are actually quite “creative”.

Bon Jovi Jacket

Copying only major brands limits the amount of stuff you can copy. But, if you help celebrities create their own product lines, then the possibilities are limitless.

You don’t even have to change the names at all!

This is just horrible – trying to be “creative” by combining the iconic Snoopy character with a tartan pattern probably inspired by Burberry. It’s a double violation of copyright in one T-shirt.

And who thought of the name Sccoby?

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