Given the lack of sex education in China, I am not surprised that many teenagers have unprotected sex. I am surprised, however, by the high number of college students who do not use contraceptives.

Check out the video below for details:

The statistics are more shocking if you consider the college students surveyed were all from the major cities in China.

I am still skeptical of these statistics as there are only around 400 samples – not a lot compared to the huge student population in China. Nevertheless, sex-ed is definitely lacking in China.

For those who are planning on visiting Tibet, be prepared to be disappointed.

Chinese authorities have closed the troubled Tibetan region to foreign tourists, ahead of the third anniversary of violent anti-government riots there.

China has increased security in Tibet since the 2008 demonstrations descended into violence and spread to neighbouring areas with significant Tibetan populations. China routinely limits foreign travel to Tibet, requiring overseas tourists to obtain special permits (in addition to Chinese visas) and also travel in tour groups. Foreign tourists were banned from travelling to the Himalayan region for more than a year after the 2008 demonstrations. This is nothing new.

How long this travel restriction will last is still unknown. Hopefully, travel to Tibet will be resumed in April (if there are no protests).

I was very tempted to visit Tibet after seeing this, but I guess it’ll have to wait.

via Yahoo! News.

elementary-sexed-1

It may come as a surprise to you, but schools in China do teach sex education. In fact, they teach kids in elementary school. Well, at least this one does.

At the Hepingli No. 1 Primary School in Dongcheng district of Beijing, students experience “fertilization” in sex education class.

During a sexual health education class, the teacher uses a game to teach students how a “sperm” and “ovum” unite after going through multiple obstacles, and even allows them to experience the hardships of a mother’s ten month pregnancy.

Check out the rest after the jump: Continue reading »

Tom Cruise may seem a bit crazy at times but he sure knows how to catch attention. This time though, he’s targeting the Chinese market.

Last week, Tom Cruise became the first Hollywood star to join Sina’s “Wei Bo” (translated as microblog) which is China’s version of Twitter.

Very quickly, in less than a week, Tom has attracted over 186,000 followers. He seems to be happy with China’s microblog and posted an interesting tweet on his official Twitter account: “We’re having fun talking to you & our new friends at http://t.sina.com.cn/ It’s the Chinese Twitter, but with a lot more functionality, CIO.” Interestingly, he is also following 404 Sina Microblog users, including pop singers from Hong Kong and Taiwan. Maybe he wants to make some Chinese celebrity friends?

There is no doubt that this is a good move by Tom and something that may become a new trend for western celebrities. China is a huge market and with Hollywood trying to reach a wide audience, staying connected with Chinese fans is definitely a good idea.

Hey! Remember to check out Tom’s micro blog here.

via M.I.C. Gadget.

In a case which doctors describe as a “miracle” and has been widely covered by the Chinese media and discussed on the internet, surgeons in southern China have removed a rusty, 10cm (4in) blade from the skull of a man who said it had been stuck in there for four years.

The 30 year old man, Li Fuyan, had been suffering from severe headaches, bad breath and breathing difficulties but never knew why. Li told doctors he had been stabbed in the lower right jaw by a robber four years ago and the blade broke off inside his head without anyone realising it.

Surgeons worked cautiously to remove the badly corroded blade without shattering it. “We checked his mouth, but no wound or scar has been found. It is very strange as to how the blade got into his head,” Xu Wen, deputy director of the hospital’s stomatology department, told state broadcaster CCTV.

Dr Eugene Flamm, chairman of neurosurgery at New York’s Montefiore medical centre, said x-ray images of the man’s head posted on the hospital’s website show the knife sitting behind the man’s throat, having missed the carotid artery and other key structures.

via The Guardian

A quick health warning: be cautious of consuming rice in China.

A study has recently found that some 10 percent of rice sold in China is contaminated with cadmium – chemical that leads to softening of the bones and kidney failure.

This heavy metal was mostly detected in rice produced in southern parts of China including Jiangxi, Hunan and Guangdong provinces. This highlights a prominent but ongoing problem of Chinese soil being polluted with heavy metals discharged from massive mining operations and other industrial activities over the years.

Other chemical substances including lead have also been detected in rice, according to a study by Nanjing Agricultural University.

Dozens of residents in Sidi village, Yangshuo county, the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, where cadmium pollution is heavy, are suspected of having the symptoms of itai-itai disease, which is characterized by pain in the joints and the spine.

Statistics from the Guilin Institute of Technology showed that the level of cadmium was 1.005 milligrams in every kilogram of locally grown rice in 1986, five times the standard amount.

Thankfully I eat rice from Thailand…

via GlobalTimes.

Here’s another reason to be excited about using Android devices.

Students at the Shanghai Jiao Tong University are currently developing and testing a new Chinese input system on Android devices. This new input, named Aeviou, is similar to Swype, with the difference being that Aeviou is only for Chinese input.

There are already quite a lot of different Chinese input methods on the market which is natural, considering the keyboard was primarily designed for English language input. However, this is only when traditional keyboard input is used. For the increasing number of mobile devices released, the main method of input for Chinese is still the PinYin method. PinYin input entails having to phonetically spell out each character and then selecting the correct character among the choices. The entire Chinese language is represented by 412 phonetic combinations so it is a long and tedious list. There is also the choice of handwriting Chinese on touchscreen devices but, although it is the most natural Chinese input method, it is also the slowest. There are so many strokes in Chinese characters that it takes a long time to input a character and thereby also increasing the chance for errors.

Aeviou intends to replace traditional PinYin input methods to become the fastest and most convenient input method for mobile devices. It removes all the vowels and the letter “v” (that’s where the name Aeviou comes from), reducing the combinations for Chinese PinYin input. This lets you literally swipe through the letters with ease, just like you would with Swype. Researchers claims that their speed tests show an increase of more than 3x against other input methods.

Now that is real fast. Check out the video below for Aeviou in action and comparison with other input methods:
Continue reading »

Although long expected by many experts, Japan has finally issued data on Monday confirming that China has surpassed it as the World’s second largest economy.

The reactions to such news has been highly mixed.

In Japan, the moment is seen as another marker of an extended weakening. Before the bubble burst, many Japanese were once proud of their country’s growth in the 80s. Now, they are further saddened as their country continues its economic struggles. Others, welcomed China’s rise; seeing it as an opportunity for trade and growth.

In China, the ruling Communist Party was ever more cautious of such news. China’s growing economic supremacy might seem positive, but it is also becoming an increasing burden as the country is expected to shoulder more global issues (like reducing carbon emissions). The headline on a recent article on the website of the People’s Daily reads: “China Surpassing Japan to Become World’s Second Biggest Economy—But Not the Second Strongest”. This in fact is very true as the GDP per capita in China is still ten times lower compared to Japan. The World Bank estimates that more than 100 million Chinese citizens—nearly the size of Japan’s entire population—live on less than $2 a day. Many in China, are still waiting for the same level of success, their country has achieved economically, to be reflected in their daily lives.

Continue reading »

Hope you had a happy Valentine’s day.

This year’s flower prices were a lot higher mainly due to inflation and the lack of supply. This hasn’t deterred many Chinese, who are determined to express their love, from buying flowers for their significant half. Nothing says I love you more than flower’s and gifts that is worth a month’s salary.

Someone, has thought of a healthier and more creative alternative. Meet this bouquet of vegetables…

This bouquet not only looks nice, but is very economic and healthy. Instead of letting flowers slowly wither away, you can actually take the vegetables and prepare a healthy meal!

This past Sunday has been labeled “Black Sunday” by Chinese netizens after China’s major file sharing site VeryCD disabled all its downloads.

Being one of the leading file-sharing sites in China, VeryCD was the major source of eMule downloads for music and videos. It had virtually everything – from Hollywood blockbusters to Korean pop songs to Japanese TV shows. Although the site is still accessible, all download links have been removed, in its place are links to licensed contents. VeryCD is now moving towards legitimacy by obtaining an official license to operate and moving towards authorized content.

After 7 years of good times, a lot of users will definitely be deeply saddened. After avoiding a crackdown against many similar sites in 2008, the pressure on VeryCD in 2011 was clearly too much. Earlier this month, China’s attempts at reducing copyright infringement have increasingly targeted the digital domain and while Youtube-like sites have taken up much of the spotlight, it was only a matter of time before linking sites like VeryCD felt similar heat.

It seems the crackdown on online piracy is now in full force and a lot earlier than most anticipated. Earlier this month, the Supreme People’s Court, the Supreme People’s Procuratorate and the Ministry of Public Security released a document which detailed penalties for online copyright infringement.

If someone uploads a movie, TV show, music, software or even image to the Internet without the consent of the copyright holder, penalties apply if certain conditions are met. These include if more than 500 pieces of the work are spread to others, if total online downloads hit 50,000 or if a site where the material is located has a sign-up membership of more than 1,000. Penalties are harsh – between 3 and 7 years in jail.

via TorrentFreak.

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