elementary-sexed-1

It may come as a surprise to you, but schools in China do teach sex education. In fact, they teach kids in elementary school. Well, at least this one does.

At the Hepingli No. 1 Primary School in Dongcheng district of Beijing, students experience “fertilization” in sex education class.

During a sexual health education class, the teacher uses a game to teach students how a “sperm” and “ovum” unite after going through multiple obstacles, and even allows them to experience the hardships of a mother’s ten month pregnancy.

Check out the rest after the jump: Continue reading »

Tom Cruise may seem a bit crazy at times but he sure knows how to catch attention. This time though, he’s targeting the Chinese market.

Last week, Tom Cruise became the first Hollywood star to join Sina’s “Wei Bo” (translated as microblog) which is China’s version of Twitter.

Very quickly, in less than a week, Tom has attracted over 186,000 followers. He seems to be happy with China’s microblog and posted an interesting tweet on his official Twitter account: “We’re having fun talking to you & our new friends at http://t.sina.com.cn/ It’s the Chinese Twitter, but with a lot more functionality, CIO.” Interestingly, he is also following 404 Sina Microblog users, including pop singers from Hong Kong and Taiwan. Maybe he wants to make some Chinese celebrity friends?

There is no doubt that this is a good move by Tom and something that may become a new trend for western celebrities. China is a huge market and with Hollywood trying to reach a wide audience, staying connected with Chinese fans is definitely a good idea.

Hey! Remember to check out Tom’s micro blog here.

via M.I.C. Gadget.

Just when I was getting excited about China’s first capsule hotel, the fire authorities in Shanghai have refused to issue an operating license.

The refusal was mainly due to fire and personal safety concerns. Apparently, the capsules were found to be made of highly flammable materials. In addition, inspectors said that the average space for each guest, which is measured at 2.4 square meters, did not meet the city’s basic requirement for renting houses and may pose difficulties for emergency evacuation.

The “Xitai Capsule Hotel” was set to be China’s first capsule hotel. The hotel features 68 cabinet-sized rooms imported from Japan – where capsule hotels originated – each equipped with a power point, clock, light, television and wireless Internet. The hotel is only opened to men with shared lavatory and shower facilities. It also has a designated area for snoring guests.

The hotel planned on charging 68 yuan ($10) for 10 hours or 88 yuan for 24 hours which is very cheap – even compared to budget hotels in China.

Ta Zan, the owner of the hotel who used to work for capsule hotels in Japan, said that without a license, he had never booked a guest since construction was completed last October. Ta regretted the denial of a license, but said that he would not give up the idea of opening capsule hotels in China.

via China.org.cn.

In a case which doctors describe as a “miracle” and has been widely covered by the Chinese media and discussed on the internet, surgeons in southern China have removed a rusty, 10cm (4in) blade from the skull of a man who said it had been stuck in there for four years.

The 30 year old man, Li Fuyan, had been suffering from severe headaches, bad breath and breathing difficulties but never knew why. Li told doctors he had been stabbed in the lower right jaw by a robber four years ago and the blade broke off inside his head without anyone realising it.

Surgeons worked cautiously to remove the badly corroded blade without shattering it. “We checked his mouth, but no wound or scar has been found. It is very strange as to how the blade got into his head,” Xu Wen, deputy director of the hospital’s stomatology department, told state broadcaster CCTV.

Dr Eugene Flamm, chairman of neurosurgery at New York’s Montefiore medical centre, said x-ray images of the man’s head posted on the hospital’s website show the knife sitting behind the man’s throat, having missed the carotid artery and other key structures.

via The Guardian

Hot on the heels of cadmium contaminated rice comes the latest health warning. It seems that cucumbers grown in the Shandong Province may contain artificial growth hormones. Farmers produce the liquid hormone using compounds from birth control pills. Although the effects of eating such cucumbers have not been confirmed, it is safe to say that everyone should stay away from them.

These cucumbers with hormones are actually very easy to identify as the flower on top of the cucumber remains healthy, due to the effects of the growth hormones. The hormone injected cucumbers also taste horrible.

Cucumbers with yellow flowers were very popular in wet markets in Jiaonan City, Shandong. The vegetables were considered tender and fresh. “People in the industry all know these cucumbers contain hormones,” a dealer selling cucumbers at a wet market told Qingdao Morning Post. The growth hormone is also available at the market. The seller boasted that the growth hormone makes the cucumber mature 50 percent faster and keeps the flower from drying up.

via Shanghai Daily.

A quick health warning: be cautious of consuming rice in China.

A study has recently found that some 10 percent of rice sold in China is contaminated with cadmium – chemical that leads to softening of the bones and kidney failure.

This heavy metal was mostly detected in rice produced in southern parts of China including Jiangxi, Hunan and Guangdong provinces. This highlights a prominent but ongoing problem of Chinese soil being polluted with heavy metals discharged from massive mining operations and other industrial activities over the years.

Other chemical substances including lead have also been detected in rice, according to a study by Nanjing Agricultural University.

Dozens of residents in Sidi village, Yangshuo county, the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, where cadmium pollution is heavy, are suspected of having the symptoms of itai-itai disease, which is characterized by pain in the joints and the spine.

Statistics from the Guilin Institute of Technology showed that the level of cadmium was 1.005 milligrams in every kilogram of locally grown rice in 1986, five times the standard amount.

Thankfully I eat rice from Thailand…

via GlobalTimes.

Meet China’s new $456,000 super-soaker. This unique fire truck features a jet-powered water cannon that sprays four tons of water per minute at distances up to 400 feet. The water is said to move at such speed that it choke fires from the oxygen surrounding them.

This all sounds pretty good but how does it perform in practice? Check this video below and find out:
Continue reading »

This past Sunday has been labeled “Black Sunday” by Chinese netizens after China’s major file sharing site VeryCD disabled all its downloads.

Being one of the leading file-sharing sites in China, VeryCD was the major source of eMule downloads for music and videos. It had virtually everything – from Hollywood blockbusters to Korean pop songs to Japanese TV shows. Although the site is still accessible, all download links have been removed, in its place are links to licensed contents. VeryCD is now moving towards legitimacy by obtaining an official license to operate and moving towards authorized content.

After 7 years of good times, a lot of users will definitely be deeply saddened. After avoiding a crackdown against many similar sites in 2008, the pressure on VeryCD in 2011 was clearly too much. Earlier this month, China’s attempts at reducing copyright infringement have increasingly targeted the digital domain and while Youtube-like sites have taken up much of the spotlight, it was only a matter of time before linking sites like VeryCD felt similar heat.

It seems the crackdown on online piracy is now in full force and a lot earlier than most anticipated. Earlier this month, the Supreme People’s Court, the Supreme People’s Procuratorate and the Ministry of Public Security released a document which detailed penalties for online copyright infringement.

If someone uploads a movie, TV show, music, software or even image to the Internet without the consent of the copyright holder, penalties apply if certain conditions are met. These include if more than 500 pieces of the work are spread to others, if total online downloads hit 50,000 or if a site where the material is located has a sign-up membership of more than 1,000. Penalties are harsh – between 3 and 7 years in jail.

via TorrentFreak.

runway-style-recruiting-1

In Chengdu, beautiful girls walk the catwalk to apply for jobs while CEOs sit in the audience to evaluate them.

Continue reading »

A hotel in China was built in just six days! This is the Arc Hotel located in Changsha.

The 15-story sustainable hotel already had its foundation prepared. By using prefabricated columns and modules as well as modern construction techniques, construction workers took just 46 hours to finish the main structural components and another 90 hours to finish the building enclosure. While the workers didn’t work all through the night, they did work until 10pm each night.

Here are some details about the hotel:

Continue reading »

© 2011 CHINALERT powered by Suffusion