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With more and more people joining the ranks of the filthy rich in China, it must be getting harder and harder to find new ways to flaunt your wealth.

It must be especially troublesome when choosing what car to buy in order to stand out from the crowd. But this person, from the city of Xianyang in Shaanxi province, has chosen a very interesting alternative form of luxury transportation.

Instead of sitting comfortably at the back of a Mercedes or BMW, he rides his horse daily to and from work. Accompanying him is his trusty secretary. Together, they ride regardless of weather.

“It normally takes a little more than 20 minutes to get to work” says He Yanqing an owner of a private company, “and I enjoy the looks from passers-by”.

Some of the reasons Mr. He gives in support of horseback riding include it being more environmentally friendly and able to avoid traffic jams.

According to Mr. He, riding a horse is also a lot more economical compared to cars. A good horse can be bought for 20,000 RMB (~3,000 USD) and the yearly maintenance is low – around 4,000 RMB (~600 USD).

As for whether this is actually road legal, it seems that according to the “PRC Road Traffic Safety Law” there are no restrictions against riding animals on roads. So it seems that there is nothing stopping Mr. He for now.

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In what might sound like a dream come true, prison inmates in China are forced to farm gold in the MMORPG World of Warcraft.

Obviously, things aren’t always as great as they sound. Check out the video below to understand why…

So instead of just suffering physically, China’s prisoners also have to suffer mentally. What might seem like an addictive hobby for a lot of gamers is torture to these prisoners.

According to the Guardian, “prison bosses made more money forcing inmates to play games than they do forcing people to do manual labour.”

This is no surprise as the virtual economy is growing rapidly. Around the World, millions of gamers are prepared to pay real money for virtual currency to obtain virtual goods in games. It is known as “gold farming” – the practice of building up credits and online value through the monotonous repetition of basic tasks in online games such as World of Warcraft. The trade in virtual assets is very real, and outside the control of game publishers.

Figures from the China Internet Centre show that nearly 2 billion dollars worth of virtual currency was traded in China in 2008 and the number of gamers who play to trade credits are on the rise. It is estimated that 80% of all gold farmers are in China; with 100,000 full-time gold farmers in the country.

From the sound of things, China is also going to be a leader of labour exploitation in the virtual world.

via The Guardian

How mad do you need get to destroy your car? What if it was a Gallardo?

Well this Chinese owner would destroyed his Gallardo over a dispute with the dealership.

The millionaire reportedly bought a Gallardo (price up to $700,000 in China) last November. Six months later, the engine wouldn’t start. The car was transported to the dealer, in Qingdao, who allegedly didn’t fix the problem but dinged the bumper and chassis during the trip. The irate owner tried unsuccessfully to get the problem fixed, to no avail. He escalated his case all the way up to Lamborghini CEO Stephen Winkelmann, but apparently the dispute wasn’t resolved.

So on March 15, World Consumer Rights Day, the Lambo owner hired a team with sledgehammers to destroy the car in public.

You can see the destruction here:

Lamborghini later issued a statement saying: “We put customer satisfaction first at Lamborghini and think that in this case we did everything to solve the problem. We solved the problem to the satisfaction of the customer.” The statement added that for reasons that are “independent from the relationship with Lamborghini, the owner decided to take this action and smash the car.”

The media later reported that the owner was a Japanese-Chinese businessman who imported the car from Japan. The Gallardo wasn’t even new, but was eight years old and probably was valued at about $80,000.

Apparently, the Lambo owner had a problem with the car, which was promptly fixed. But the owner had a larger business dispute with the businessman who owned the Lamborghini dealership in Qingdao. The event was used for the owner to gain publicity for his own business and to discredit the owner of the Lambo dealer owner.

This explanation is more compelling given the fact the owner placed stickers on the car bearing his own company’s logo (As you can see in the photo above). He also smashed the car in front of his company’s office building, to direct more attention to his business.

I guess the answer to the opening question would be: no one. At least no one is mad enough to calmly hire a group of workers, put banners on the car, drag the car to office and wait until World Consumer Rights Day before smashing the car.

via WSJ 1 and 2

The People’s Liberation Army (PLA) of China normally evokes a strict and disciplined image. This image, however, elicits the scorn of many Chinese that is usually reserved for the filthy rich.

A Chinese netizen posted about running into the two women wearing military uniforms at the Shenzhen airport and shocked by how they were accessorized: two shoulder bags/purses, a Burberry and LV (Louis Vuitton) respectively, LV branded luggage bags and suitcases, and the black paper bag at the bottom left corner of the photo was a newly purchased Gucci.

Attentive netizens calculated how much all of the items in the picture cost: Large LV luggage bag/each = 58,500 yuan, 5 * 58,500 = 292,500 yuan, small LV bag/each = 26,000 yuan, 2 * 26,000 = 52,000 yuan, and not including the rolling suitcase and other items, the total: 344,500 yuan (~52,197 USD).

The question is whether the army personnel are that well paid or are they just carrying fakes.

via chinaSMACK.

This is pretty insane. I don’t know if fake iPhones in China are really that cheap or if some people have way too much money.

Whatever it is, this is one of the most wasteful and cockiest ways to play card games.

I would really like to know how this person charges all those phones once he finishes playing…

via M.I.C. Gadget.

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It may come as a surprise to you, but schools in China do teach sex education. In fact, they teach kids in elementary school. Well, at least this one does.

At the Hepingli No. 1 Primary School in Dongcheng district of Beijing, students experience “fertilization” in sex education class.

During a sexual health education class, the teacher uses a game to teach students how a “sperm” and “ovum” unite after going through multiple obstacles, and even allows them to experience the hardships of a mother’s ten month pregnancy.

Check out the rest after the jump: Continue reading »

In a case which doctors describe as a “miracle” and has been widely covered by the Chinese media and discussed on the internet, surgeons in southern China have removed a rusty, 10cm (4in) blade from the skull of a man who said it had been stuck in there for four years.

The 30 year old man, Li Fuyan, had been suffering from severe headaches, bad breath and breathing difficulties but never knew why. Li told doctors he had been stabbed in the lower right jaw by a robber four years ago and the blade broke off inside his head without anyone realising it.

Surgeons worked cautiously to remove the badly corroded blade without shattering it. “We checked his mouth, but no wound or scar has been found. It is very strange as to how the blade got into his head,” Xu Wen, deputy director of the hospital’s stomatology department, told state broadcaster CCTV.

Dr Eugene Flamm, chairman of neurosurgery at New York’s Montefiore medical centre, said x-ray images of the man’s head posted on the hospital’s website show the knife sitting behind the man’s throat, having missed the carotid artery and other key structures.

via The Guardian

Taiwan has some of the craziest stories.

A convenience store employee had his face rubbed with feces by an angry customer who tried to use the store’s bathroom. The customer urgently needed to shit but was faced with a locked toilet door. Unable to hold it in anymore, the customer let it all slip out. Being more angry than embarrassed, this customer started going on a rampage which ended with poo everywhere.

See for yourselves:

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It’s really here. McDonald’s in Hong Kong has launched McWeddings as an official product offering.

I am speechless. I have joked about a McDonald’s wedding reception on many occasions, but that was an idea to make sure no one comes to my wedding. As someone who was born and raised mainly in Hong Kong, I feel really ashamed of having the title of World’s first McWedding attached to the place I live.

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Life in Taiwan must be pretty crap or else the prisons over there must be first class.

A 44 year old man in Taiwan was caught robbing a convenience store. The problem was this person obviously did not have the intent to rob anything but to get caught by the police. This man checked for security cameras, asked the clerk to call the police and waited to get caught. The man waited patiently while other customers came and go. Occasionally, the man asked the clerk to call the police again. It’s almost as if this was some kind of service the convenience store provided.

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